More probes of Mueller report will serve no one

At long last, special counsel Robert Mueller’s full report may be ready for prime time. Attorney General William Barr has been perusing it, and at some point, the document will go to Congress. No doubt it will be leaked to the public within minutes.

But Mueller has made it clear his team of investigators and prosecutors has come up with nothing meriting additional indictments. Quite a few people have been charged. Some have been convicted. But in each and every case, their crimes were not linked to allegations President Donald Trump cooperated with the Russian government in an attempt to influence the 2016 election.

Some Democratic leaders have taken that as their cue to argue, in effect, that while there may have been no prosecutable “collusion,” surely Trump is guilty of other offenses. They will concentrate, through hearings in the House of Representatives, of digging up that dirt, the many of the president’s foes vow.

But what will that accomplish? Perhaps Trump’s adversaries can find some unflattering information to reveal to the public. His pre-politics business career may contain some unsavory episodes. That could affect the 2020 election.

In the meantime, much of the business of Congress will be shoved into the background.

Will hearings on Trump repair crumbling infrastructure in America?

Will they accelerate the already booming U.S. economy?

Will they provide any improvements regarding health insurance?

Will they — dare we ask it? — make our southern border any more secure?

No.

Earlier this month, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said it was time to end the Democrats’ preoccupation with impeaching Trump. Pelosi, D-California, suggested Congress should move on to getting things done for the American people.

Pelosi is no friend of the president’s. Yet her suggestion has been condemned, sometimes in vicious terms, by some of her fellow Democrats. Clearly, they are more interested in pursuing a political vendetta than in governing.

Some follow-up to the Mueller report is to be expected — and is necessary. But spending the next year and a half attempting to do what Mueller’s team failed to accomplish is not in the best interests of the American people.

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