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June 21, 2009
Salem News

Parent appreciates

'The Battle of the Bands'

To the editor:

The reason for this letter is for the last three years, on the last day of school, Mr. Kirkland has organized what is called "The Battle of the Bands."

The Battle of the Bands is where kids that have practiced and worked hard can get their bands together and play for the seventh and eighth-grade classes.

It's not only a nice outlet for the kids on the last day of school, it gives those kids that love music, a chance to play for their friends and family in a concert like setting. Speaking for me it's nice to see these kids being encouraged to do something that they love!

My son has never really been interested in sports and music has been a really good outlet for him. My husband and I have always encouraged and supported him in his love of music, but it's truly great to see it being acknowledged in school also!

So once again, thank you Mr. Kirkland and Salem Schools for supporting these kids, and giving them a chance to show their talents.

JAMI TURNBULL,

Salem

A letter for the

county commissioners

To the editor:

Dear Columbiana County Commissioners, please allow me to introduce myself.

My name is Linda (Guildoo) Coe and I would like to talk to you about the Clock Tower Project. I am a lifelong resident and a taxpayer in Columbiana County, but I also have a more personal reason for approaching you about this subject.

My grandfather, Martin Guildoo, worked for the WPA and worked on the clock tower when it was first built. He passed away from pneumonia while working on the clock. His death is directly related to the clock.

My grandfather was working on the clock when his crew accidentally left without him to return to East Liverpool at the end of the day. He was forced to walk from Lisbon to East Liverpool and that is when he caught pneumonia and died a week later at age 57.

That is why the Lisbon clock is very important to our family. We need this project to be done right. No more duct tape and paper clips. No more taking the inexpensive way out. No more temporary fix. It is, as I am sure you know, a beautiful work of art and I for one would like to see it working properly for more than 10 minutes.

I do realize that fixing it and fixing it right will require a great deal of money, but I am sure that the money can be raised for this without additional funds having to come from the county.

Please, let's get this done right this time. Let's have the county courthouse clock be returned to the same condition as it was originally and once again restore the beauty of one of the most beautiful pieces of architectural history in Lisbon.

LINDA (GUILDOO) COE,

Lisbon

Unhappy with prospect

of reducing police force

To the editor:

A government job's a good gig if you can get it, right mayor? Here's the part that you seem to have forgotten though-when you draw your pay from the taxpayers, you are accountable to them. When you are an elected official, you have a responsibility to act in the best interest of your constituents. Maybe it's because you've been feeding at the public trough for so long, that you seem to have forgotten these things.

Acting in the best interest of your constituents does not mean acting in the best interest of your buddies, or in the best interest of only council members. This is how you draw the ire of the taxpayer aka voter. For example, you were made aware of hazardous potholes on West School Street. Your response-fix the one pothole directly across from Greg Oesch's mother's house. You have a responsibility to spend our money to benefit us, not just some of us.

Look around your city, mayor, times are tough in Salem. Maybe your house hasn't been disrupted, but drive around town-people are strained. That makes it all the harder to see their hard-earned money being misused.

Tough times call for tough measures right? Well, Salem residents know about belt-tightening, but knowing where cuts can be made and were funding needs to be increased is a vital part of being a leader. The police department is one of those areas that should never be on the list for budget cuts. When times are tough, other areas need to sacrifice to make sure the police department is running at full staff.

Just like every other time in history when the country was in recession, and just like every other place in the country, when the general public is facing financial hardship-crimes goes up. Now is not the time to be saving money by reducing police protection in the city. I'm not sure whose bright idea it was, but try to look at this with some common sense-parking empty police cruisers around town does not deter crime!

I was asked recently by someone who isn't from Salem, but was passing through, "What's up with the empty police cars parked around Salem?" If someone who is just passing through notices that there are no officers attached to those cars, why wouldn't residents and criminals who live here notice? Any empty cruiser provides no protection!

Maybe it's time you got out of your office and took a walk around Salem. Talk to your constituents-not your good ol' boys, the residents of Salem you don't golf with. Find out what the good people of your city need. Ask them for their ideas and maybe show that you actually care about this city and not just how you can keep feeding off of us like a piranha.

DOUGLAS L. BRANNON,

Salem

Doesn't support move

to raise city income tax

To the editor:

I am writing in response to the mayor's request to raise the city income tax by 1/2 percent. This is just an another example of an elected official protecting his constituency. Anyone with already acquired wealth, not working, doesn't pay a dime in new tax. Only those working and struggling to make ends meet in this troubling economy will be paying.

If you look at basic economics, our federal government has just dumped trillions of dollars into the economy. Money that we don't have. This is going to trigger super double digit inflation. It has already started. Look at your grocery bills, costs are already going up. This is just the beginning. The inflation we will experience will make the 1970s seem like nothing.

The last thing we need to do is allow the city government to take anymore income. Find another way. Train and hire the hundreds of Salem city unemployed residents to work on the streets rather than paying some large outside company to take our money. Solicit donations from the dozens of multi-millionaires that we all know live in Salem and Perry Township. They dump thousands of dollars into athletics but nothing into the improvement of the city. It doesn't pay to fix up the streets when so many houses are falling down because of low income and unemployment. The streets may look great with your plan but the houses will look like garbage because the people that live in them are not able to find anything better than the minimum wage jobs on the east side of town or worse, public assistance.

So Jerry, rather than raising the tax another 1/2 percent and worrying about the roads in Salem, why don't you spend your time recruiting manufacturing jobs back into this city. Therefore, by basic mathematics, the income will be there.

KEITH CHILTON,

Salem

Why were the flags

removed at cemetery?

To the editor:

A few days before Memorial Day my husband and I took some flower pots to place on the graves of relatives at Grandview Cemetery in Salem.

The grounds looked stunning, carefully manicured with the many flowers and the U. S. flags waving beautifully on the veteran's graves throughout the cemetery.

Just over a week later I returned to Grandview to water my plants on the graves. The flag holders remained on the veteran's graves but there was not a flag to be seen. Where are all the flags? It certainly is not a matter of cost as the flags are provided by the various veteran organizations.

If the flags become tattered or worn they should be removed or replaced, however, they remain bright and fresh for several months. It seems so disrespectful to our veterans, some who gave their lives and all who gave their service to protect our freedom. Apparently honoring our veterans in Salem is just a one day show.

JUDY HESTON,

Salem

Have you had enough

of Obama-speak?

To the editor:

Well, have you had enough Obama-speak?

First we were told that Obama's multi-billion dollar stimulus package would turn the nation's floundering economy around. It hasn't. In fact, things are only getting worse.

Then, we were told that Obama's multi-billion dollar bailout of the big Wall Street banks would "bolster" the banks and enable them to start lending again. But, the banks are not lending again. All we got for our billions were obscene executive bonuses on Wall Street, orchestrated by Obama's tax-cheating treasury secretary.

After an initial multi-billion bailout to GM and Chrysler, Obama promised us he was going to stop the auto giants from going bankrupt. He didn't. Now we learn that there will be no court-ordered restructuring, but rather an Obama-ordered restructuring which will pour yet more taxpayer billions into union-ravaged facilities that will remain uncompetitive and functionally bankrupt. To make matters worse, Obama has just made the American taxpayer "partners" with the UAW in what will be more years and more billions in taxpayer losses.

The "intellectuals" still defend this fraud. They are cocksure of Obama's "brilliance." And oh how they love his disdain for free enterprise economics. Of course, the intellectuals aren't meeting payrolls. They aren't the "doers." They are the "thinkers" among us...the ones that "know" so much more than everybody else. The jobless millions are nothing more than pawns on their chess board.

As one after another company continues to fail and millions of Americans across this land lose their job, there will be more home foreclosures and more hardship felt on Main Street. Companies won't just close down for a while; they will die, like Eljer's did here in Salem.

In turn, the tax base of every community in the nation will falter, leaving a larger and larger tax burden upon the shoulders of fewer and fewer Americans who will be admonished to be "patriotic" and pay more of their income to the government.

Make no mistake about it: the effects of Obama-speak are only in their infancy. With time, they will expand and deepen the dependency of America upon the state.

They will choke off initiative as they reward mediocrity. And, they will ensure a future that is wrought with national indebtedness, high taxes at every level and a widening economic malaise.

FRED WERNER,

Salem

A safety reminder

for all motorists

To the editor:

With summer and the warm weather upon us, we would like to remind drivers that there are motorcyclists sharing the road with them. Motorcycling is a fun activity enjoyed by men and women, young and old, experienced and new riders.

It is a state law that we must ride with our headlights on at all times. Sometimes the headlight is the first thing to be seen. Most motorcyclists are cautious and aware of obstacles and other traffic. There are, of course, hidden dangers on the road.

There has already been a couple of local motorcyclists killed while riding this year. We would just like people to be extra cautious and look at least twice before pulling into traffic so that we all may be safe on our roads.

Here a few suggestions for us all to heed:

Respect the motorcyclist. They have the same privileges as any vehicle.

Provide motorcycle riders a full lane of travel and the same room when passing as a car.

Look out for motorcycles on the highway, at intersections, when making a left turn and when changing lanes. Most accidents occur at intersections and most often when the oncoming vehicle makes a left turn in front of the motorcycle.

Anticipate a motorcycle's maneuver. Often, obstructions that four-wheeled vehicles can ignore, such as potholes and debris, cause motorcyclists to take evasive actions.

Allow plenty of space. Don't follow a motorcycle too closely, and allow enough room for them to take evasive action. Motorcycles can stop in a shorter distance.

Let's all make this a safe summer for everyone.

KEN and DIANE DETELL,

Salem

 
 

 

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