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OUR READERS WRITE...

October 30, 2009
Salem News

Passage of Issue 3 would hurt Ohio

To the editor:

Ohioans have rightly turned down casino gambling four times over the past 19 years. Over 10 million votes have been cast in opposition to opening casinos in Ohio. The people of this state have it figured out: gambling is a great deal-if you own a casino.

The out-of-state casino owners promoting Issue 3 will make billions of dollars if the measure passes. They plan to do this by focusing on creating a new class of gamblers and gambling addicts, most of whom will live within a 50-mile radius of their casinos.

This new class of gambling patrons will be "local" customers, people who will not be "new" Ohio consumers, coming into Ohio to buy food, clothing, cars, furniture, appliances, health care policies or paying for college tuition. Their normal consumer dollars will merely be redirected into casinos and straight into the coffers of out-of-state companies.

Mike Curtin of the Columbus Dispatch writes of this potential cannibalization of the Ohio economy, stating: "the academic literature on this point is clear-casinos siphon money from other entertainment and retail venues, creating no new, net state economic benefit. A dollar spent at a casino, moreover, is lost by a nearby restaurant, a music hall or a movie theater. It's a transfer of jobs, not a creation of jobs."

William N. Thompson, a public-administration professor at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas confirmed this, noting that "casino jobs are actually created out of job losses to the economy." He states, furthermore, that "a casino-induced economic stimulus is absurd - it's a fool's bet."

The widely advertised notion that voter passage of Issue 3 would create 34,000 new jobs is equally absurd. Penn National, the sponsor of Issue 3, owns 18 gambling facilities nationwide and employs roughly 14,000 people. How will four Ohio casinos create 34,000 real jobs or anything remotely close to that false promise?

Casinos don't help Ohio manufacturers who need a quality work force. Very few businesses are interested in locating near a casino facility. It's tough enough to train and keep good employees these days. The last thing we need is one more distractions that create addictions, financial discord or tear apart families.

Handing over our state Constitution to a bunch of out-of-state gambling moguls-so they can establish a private gambling monopoly-would put this state on a reckless course, one that would ultimately cost Ohio far more jobs than it will create. On Nov. 3, Ohioans would be wise to protect their state Constitution, their economy and their families by voting no on Issue 3.

DAVID W. JOHNSON,

Salem

Editor's note: Johnson is the chairman of the ?Republican Party of Columbiana County

Asks for support of replacement levy

To the editor:

The Columbiana County Health Department Cancer Detection Clinic Levy is going to appear on the ballot on Nov. 3.

This .2 mill replacement levy is fully endorsed by the American Cancer Society Advisory Board of Columbiana County.

We hope voters will decide to help in the mission to reduce cancer incidence and mortality. This ballot levy will provide a number of different cancer screenings.

The American Cancer Society has concrete evidence that screenings can detect cancer at an early stage and treatment is much more successful. We fully support this levy.

BRYON ANZEVINO,

Director of Community Development

American Cancer Society staff liaison of Columbiana County

Voters need to be careful

To the editor:

Voters in Fairfield Township need to be very careful to whom they give the green light to serve as township trustee. Blind voting will bring trouble to all of us.

Check on the performance, observe behavior of candidates at public meetings of the township. There needs to be attendance of the general public at township meetings.

People need to see for themselves, hear for themselves, during township meetings, past and present. We need to protect our benefits and our votes.

WILMER D. SWOPE,

Leetonia

 
 

 

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