Goshen cops host training academy

The Goshen Police District this week hosted advanced building clearance training provided for free by the Ohio Peace Officer's Training Academy's mobile unit through the state attorney general's office. Goshen officer Ryan Connolly checks a doorway before entering a structure while fellow Goshen officer Troy Mackall, left, and Nick Brent look on. (Salem News photo by Kevin Howell)

The Goshen Police District this week hosted advanced building clearance training provided for free by the Ohio Peace Officer's Training Academy's mobile unit through the state attorney general's office. Goshen officer Ryan Connolly checks a doorway before entering a structure while fellow Goshen officer Troy Mackall, left, and Nick Brent look on. (Salem News photo by Kevin Howell)

GOSHEN TWP. — The Goshen Police District this week hosted area departments in advanced building clearance training.

Funded by the attorney general’s office and conducted by the Ohio Peace Officer’s Training Academy (OPOTA), the training was part of OPOTA’s mobile academy to teach weapons manipulation techniques and tactics used to search interior structures.

Nearly 40 officers from departments including Goshen Township, Smith Township, Salem, East Palestine and the Columbiana County Drug Task Force attended the training held Tuesday through Thursday in the gymnasium of the Goshen Township Administration Building.

“This has been a great opportunity for training,” said Goshen Police Chief Steve McDaniel, who noted it accounted for eight of 20 hours required training without having to travel far away to complete. “It’s brought together a group of different officers, different departments in the area.”

OPOTA, provided for free through the attorney general’s office, included three instructors each day as well as the training, mobile unit and ammunition. The mobile unit consisted of tarp walls that could be moved around quickly to create several different interior layouts, with mannequins placed strategically throughout to simulate different situations. Officers were given weapons of true Glock handgun weight with cartridges similar to advanced paintballs.

The training prepares officers for weapon handling in actual setting scenarios, offering a reinforcement of previous training as well as what officers learn in the police academy. Officers respond to alarm drops and open doors in which there are possible burglars inside and a lot of unknowns when entering a building, and they need to enter safely and arrest the suspect if there is someone inside.

“With funding the way that it is, a variety of training is available,” McDaniel said. “The instructors they provide have been excellent, very informative, but at the same time, very open to ideas.”

khowell@salemnews.net

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