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Gallery: Southeast students, staff hold a special observance

Madison Galchick was among Salem Southeast School students learning important history while having fun such as making Native American-like jewelry during a Thanksgiving-based Native American Language Arts and Social Studies Day held prior to the holiday. See today’s C1 Spotlight page and also visit salemnews.net. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer) Madison Galchick was among Salem Southeast School students learning important history while having fun such as making Native American-like jewelry during a Thanksgiving-based Native American Language Arts and Social Studies Day held prior to the holiday. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer)

Lessons of Thanksgiving were taught across the Salem Schools classrooms prior to the special holiday including at Southeast School

The fifth grade observed an entire learning day for Native American Language Arts and Social Studies Day.

Each student participated in reading the novel, “The Sign of the Beaver,” by Elizabeth George Speare during the month of November in Language Arts. This classic novel focuses on Colonial America and Native American culture. Focusing on fluency, comprehension, and discussion, the students eagerly participated in many different activities which immersed them in early American history, problem solving, and social issues. In addition, the Social Studies classes paralleled their lessons about the thirteen colonies and Native American Regions. The staff members also included the history of the early “Quakers” during this time period. The students were intrigued to hear stories and the history about their school mascot.

Following closely Ohio State Standards, the 5th grade staff structured six different Native American hands on activities for the day before Thanksgiving break began.

Michelle Kosko, Pamela Jay, and Pam Corll worked with the students on making authentic Native American jewelry that the students learned when reading about the different Native American Regions’ cultures.

Some of the eager-to-learn 5th graders are shown with teacher Jennifer Woods and Kellie Wright, a bus driver and custodian, who wore authentic colonial apparel. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer)

Kylie Baker and Lindsay Sheen engaged the students with making and tasting of corn cakes with molasses at her Native American station.

The 5th grade students had mixed reactions when following a recipe and tasting this traditional colonial treat.

Kassie Manski and Sarah White intrigued the students at her station by exploring more aspects of the Native American Culture.

Russ Hopple and Renee Weeda helped the students make traditional Native American names by having the students read literature on how names were assigned in different tribes.

Amy Orville and Pat Beil was excited to make totem poles with each homeroom to be displayed. The homerooms had to read and decide what they wanted their totem pole to represent in colors and with animals.

Demonstrator Kellie Wright, dressed in authentic colonial apparel, displays a coyote pelt to, from left, Danilo Perez, Juan Gonzalez and Will Russell. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer)

The final station included Jennifer Woods and Kellie Wright who dressed up in authentic colonial apparel and the students watched a real life hunting and trapping demonstration.

The 5th grade staff was excited to provide an engaging hands on learning day that brought the history out of the textbooks and into real life.

“This was a dynamic learning day for our young Quakers, as their hard work of reading non-fiction literature during November came to life today in their very own 5th grade hallway! Our goal is to provide them with solid literary skills to create lifelong readers,” shared Jennifer Woods, 5th grade Language Arts/Social Studies Teacher.

The 5th grade would like to extend a special thank you to Kathy Catrell and the Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center for providing many different resources for this learning day. Another special thank you to Glenn Hershberger, of Hershberger Wildlife Taxidermy for providing several animal displays for the students to observe closely.

The 5th graders were encouraged to share their new found knowledge of colonial America with their families around their own Thanksgiving dinner table.

Shown with a teepee are, from left, 5th graders Harli McCallister, Peyton Colbert and T.J. Evancho. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer)

– Submitted material.

Pamela Jay shows curious students part of the process of making of Native American jewelry. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer)

Emily Culp displays were creation. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer)

Teacher Jennifer Wood wore authentic period clothing as part of the project. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer)

Sarah White intrigued the students at her station by exploring more aspects of the Native American Culture. (Salem News photo by J.D. Creer)

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